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Wool plaid cooler

Coolers

A cooler is a lightweight, absorbent cover designed to help a wet horse dry slowly without getting chilled. Essential during cold or cool, breezy weather, these items are also valuable in hot times. Even when he doesn’t need protection from chilling, a cooler can help dry a horse more quickly by wicking moisture away from his hair and letting it evaporate from the outer surface of the cooler. Sometimes, during cold weather, frost will form on the outside of the cooler, a sure sign that it’s working! In the winter, you can layer two coolers after bathing a horse and remove the inner cooler once it has absorbed most of the moisture.

Click photo to purchase

Click photo to purchase

The typical cooler style covers the horse from poll to tail and hangs very long on the sides. It usually has a browband, two or more light tie straps under the neck, and a tail loop, but no surcingle or leg straps. This style is good for throwing over a horse, tack and all, after a workout to allow him to cool down while walking or untacking. Small size is 66 by 72 inches, Regular size is 84 by 90 inches, and Large is 90 by 96 inches.

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Click photo to purchase

Coolers also come in a more fitted stable-sheet style, with one or more belly attachments, front closures, and possibly leg straps. Because this style is more secure on the horse, it’s better suited for a horse that’s unattended, such as a horse turned into a stall or paddock to munch hay after a bath or workout.

Click photo to purchase

Click photo to purchase

Coolers used on sweaty horses need to be easily washable, since the dirt and minerals from sweat remain in the material after the moisture evaporates. Since wool coolers, even when washed cold, are more prone to shrinking than synthetic coolers, you can minimize their trips to the washing machine by double-layering them with a more washable synthetic cooler next to the horse.

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Knots

Part of being a horseman is knowing how to tie knots. Four knots you should master: the quick release knot, the bowline, the half hitch, and the sheet bend.

Quick Release Knot.

As the name implies, this knot can be released quickly with a pull on the tail of the rope. It is used to tie a horse to a hitch rail or post, or to a horse trailer. You can also use it to tie individual reins to a surcingle or to rigging rings on a Western saddle. Also called a manger knot, it was the knot used to tie horses at their mangers when horses were kept in tie stalls. With practice, you can tie the quick release knot without hesitation and keep your fingers out of the loops while tying.

Tying the Quick Release Knot

 

Run the tail of the rope (called the free end) over the rail or through the tie ring. Hold the standing end (the portion attached to the horse) and the free end together in your left hand.

With your right hand, pick up a portion of the free end of the rope and make a fold (bight) in it. Cross the fold over the two ropes you are holding in your left hand and through the loop that has formed. (Take care not to let your fingers get inside any of the loops, because if your horse were to pull at this point, your fingers could get trapped in the loops.)

Grab the bight and pull it through the loop. Pull until the U-shaped bight is about 6 inches long and the knot is snug.

Grasp the standing portion of the lead rope with your left hand and the knot with your right hand. As you pull with your left hand, slide the knot up to the ring or the rail with your right hand.

To release, just pull the free end. If you horse has learned how to nibble the quick release knot and free himself, you will have to “horse proof” the knot by dropping the tail of the rope through the loop. In order to release a horseproof quick release, you must first remove the tail from the loop.

Bowline Knot.

 

This is a non-tightening knot that is safe to use as a neck rope or in restraint.


Half Hitch.

 

Not actually a knot, this is a hitch made by looping a rope or strap around an object and then back around itself. Useful to fasten a pair of reins over a Western saddle horn; to fasten the leading end of a mecate to a Western saddle horn; and to secure a quick release knot.


Sheet Bend.

This is used to fasten a rope halter or a fiador (rope throatlatch on a bosal) onto a horse.

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Browse our Tack Shop – Great Deals like this 1/4″ Horsehair Mecate

Buy One Get Two Free

 

 

 

No that is not a typo………..read on……….

These vintage leather saddle bags were made around the late 1940s to early 1950s by Keith Robbins, who was born in 1927. Following is an excerpt from Robbins biography that was written by his son.

It was at this time that Dad worked at the Utahn Saddle Co. (they couldn’t use “Utah” and have it as registered companies name so they called it Utahn). It was a business his father started because he couldn’t find a saddle that was comfortable to him. They began with about five employees, including my Dad. One of their main customers was Sears.

As a publicity stunt, they strapped a saddle on the outside of a single-engine airplane. A flight instructor rode around the Salt Lake valley while sitting in the saddle on the back of the airplane. Eventually, the Utahn Saddle Shop went bankrupt. Then my Dad went to work for Jenkins Saddle Shop.”

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Utahn Saddle Co., Vernon Utah vintage Late 1940s, early 1950s heavy skirting leather all stitching intact very clean inside 39″ long from end to end each of the two expandable side pockets are 10 x 12 and the softer chrome tanned leather in the expansion area allows them to be 3 3/4″ deep so hold a lot of stuff

Pacing
Dear Cherry,

We just purchased a two-year-old filly and brought her home. She is in a 24-foot by 12-foot outside stall. She paces back and forth. We tried putting her in a 50-foot round pen and she paced there. Do you have any suggestions? We love the filly and are getting her broke. Help!

Heidi

Hi Heidi,

Here are a series of questions that might help you pinpoint the cause and head toward a cure. Possible causes: Have you checked her ration to be sure you are not feeding her too much high energy feed, such as grain, concentrates, or alfalfa hay? Is she getting plenty of exercise with her training? Does she have time to socialize with other horses?
Possible cures: Can you turn this filly out with another horse, at least occasionally? Do you have any pastures or large paddocks that the horse can be turned out in for at least an hour or so a day? Is she the type of horse that won’t get too fat if she eats a little bit all day? If so, can you feed her some grass hay about four or five times a day?

Cherry Hill

Take advantage of our Book Sale. Buy One and Get TWO FREE on this page. New books are being added weekly in both categories.

We’ve just added some great behavior books about vices and bad habits. horse-owners-problem-solver-200hproblem-horse-200h

Which Itch Is Which?

Biting gnats, lice, ticks, fungus, and allergies can all cause itching. If your horse rubs bald spots in his mane or tail, check him thoroughly for external parasites such as lice or ticks, parasites (such as pinworms), or fungus, and treat according to your veterinarian’s instructions.

Itching can also be caused by ringworm, which is contagious to you and other horses. If a horse has ringworm, you will need not only to treat the horse but also to disinfect grooming tools, halters, blankets, stalls, feeders, and anything else he may have rubbed on.

Some horses (and dogs) seem to be hypersensitive or allergic to insect bites and once they are bitten, they go into a rubbing frenzy, which then invites other complications. In some cases, this is referred to as sweet itch or Queensland itch. A veterinarian should be consulted, but prevention of bites to susceptible animals is paramount. Remedies include soothing witch hazel or vinegar rinses, and possibly a corticosteroid prescription from your veterinarian.

 

Take advantage of our Book Sale. Buy One and Get TWO FREE on this page. New books are being added weekly in both categories.

We’ve just added some great equine veterinary texts and references books.

equine-medicine-surgery-3-bothhorseowners-veterinary-handbook

Ten Skin Ailments to Avoid

Here is a brief primer on some of the most common skin problems that might plague a horse.

Rain rot is caused by Dermatophilus, an infectious microorganism from the soil that eagerly becomes established in skin cracks under a dirty hair coat during rainy weather. The painful, tight scabs that form on the horse’s neck, shoulders, back, and rump make him uncomfortable and unusable and require medication and bathing.

Seborrhea is a skin disease caused by a malfunction in sebum production and function, resulting in flaky skin.

Ringworm is a fungal infection affecting the skin and hair, characterized by round, crusty patches with hair loss. It is easily spread between horses via tack and grooming tools.

Photosensitivity of the skin (usually under white hair) can result from components of certain plants (ingested). The skin becomes red, then sloughs off.

Warts, most commonly on the muzzle of a young horse, are caused by the equine papillomavirus. As a horse matures, he develops immunity to the virus and the warts disappear. The same virus also causes aural plaque, a scaly condition inside the ear, which can become painful if flies are allowed to bite and feed inside the ears.

Sarcoids are common skin tumors with unknown cause. There are several types, mostly occurring around the head or the site of an old injury.

Thrush is a fungal infection of the hoof that thrives in moist, dirty environments.

Scratches (also known as grease heel) is a common term that refers to a general localized skin inflammation found on the lower legs of horses. The thick, chronic sores at the heels and rear of the pastern can be quite painful. Scratches are linked to an opportunistic fungus, but can be complicated by bacterial infection.

Ticks cause crusty scabs and can be disease carriers. Check the mane and tail carefully throughout spring and summer. Use rubber gloves or tweezers to remove ticks, which can carry Lyme disease that can also affect humans (see July Vet Clinic). Be sure to remove the entire tick. If the head is left in, it can cause a painful infection.

Lice are not common in horses unless they are poorly kept and crowded. Then lice can spread rapidly through a group. You’d find the nits (eggs) or the lice themselves along the midline of the horse, such as in the mane and tail head.

 

Take advantage of our Book Sale. Buy One and Get TWO FREE on this page. New books are being added weekly in both categories.

horse-books-used-group-198w

Here are a few added this week:

horse-behavior201-handy-hints

Lightning

During the spring and summer, when you and your horses are leading your active lives, be aware of the potential danger of lighting. In the United States, approximately 300 human injuries and 65 deaths are attributed to lightning strikes each year. There are no statistics on horses or livestock, but the casualties can be quite high when lightning hits a herd.

Lightning is associated with developing summer thunderstorms. As air heats and causes cumulus clouds to grow upward, the stage is set for lightning. When lightning strikes, it can be a direct hit from the cloud-to-ground flash or it can erupt from the charge traveling along the ground.

When a storm is 10 miles away, you can usually hear the thunder, and if you can hear thunder, you are considered within striking range of lighting. The National Weather Service suggests using the 30-30 Rule to determine how far you are from the danger of a storm. If you are within six miles of the storm, you should seek shelter for you and your horse. It is recommended to stay in the shelter until 30 minutes after you hear the last clap of thunder.

 

The 30-30 Rule

If you have a clear line of sight to the storm, when you see lightning, count (or look at your watch) until you hear thunder. If the time elapsed between the lightning and thunder is 30 seconds or less, the thunderstorm is within six miles of you and is considered dangerous. You and your horse should seek shelter immediately. Remain there until 30 minutes after you hear the last thunderclap.

Remember the book sale we are running – Buy One and Get Two FREE

http://www.horsekeeping.com/horse_books/used/used-horse/horse-books-used.htm

Here is one of the batch that was added today.

Buy One Get Two Free

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