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Archive for the ‘Hoof Care’ Category

Ten Skin Ailments to Avoid

Here is a brief primer on some of the most common skin problems that might plague a horse.

Rain rot is caused by Dermatophilus, an infectious microorganism from the soil that eagerly becomes established in skin cracks under a dirty hair coat during rainy weather. The painful, tight scabs that form on the horse’s neck, shoulders, back, and rump make him uncomfortable and unusable and require medication and bathing.

Seborrhea is a skin disease caused by a malfunction in sebum production and function, resulting in flaky skin.

Ringworm is a fungal infection affecting the skin and hair, characterized by round, crusty patches with hair loss. It is easily spread between horses via tack and grooming tools.

Photosensitivity of the skin (usually under white hair) can result from components of certain plants (ingested). The skin becomes red, then sloughs off.

Warts, most commonly on the muzzle of a young horse, are caused by the equine papillomavirus. As a horse matures, he develops immunity to the virus and the warts disappear. The same virus also causes aural plaque, a scaly condition inside the ear, which can become painful if flies are allowed to bite and feed inside the ears.

Sarcoids are common skin tumors with unknown cause. There are several types, mostly occurring around the head or the site of an old injury.

Thrush is a fungal infection of the hoof that thrives in moist, dirty environments.

Scratches (also known as grease heel) is a common term that refers to a general localized skin inflammation found on the lower legs of horses. The thick, chronic sores at the heels and rear of the pastern can be quite painful. Scratches are linked to an opportunistic fungus, but can be complicated by bacterial infection.

Ticks cause crusty scabs and can be disease carriers. Check the mane and tail carefully throughout spring and summer. Use rubber gloves or tweezers to remove ticks, which can carry Lyme disease that can also affect humans (see July Vet Clinic). Be sure to remove the entire tick. If the head is left in, it can cause a painful infection.

Lice are not common in horses unless they are poorly kept and crowded. Then lice can spread rapidly through a group. You’d find the nits (eggs) or the lice themselves along the midline of the horse, such as in the mane and tail head.

 

Take advantage of our Book Sale. Buy One and Get TWO FREE on this page. New books are being added weekly in both categories.

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Here are a few added this week:

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If you have a question about horse care, facilities, horse behavior or training, perhaps your questions has already been asked and answered on my Horse Information Roundup.
There you can browse by categories such as Hoof Care, Riding and Mounted Training or Horse Clothing just to name a few………

OR you can use the Horsekeeping search tool at the top of the page to type in a word or phrase and that will create a list of articles that contain that subject.

To get more in depth information, you can browse through my complete books list. Here is the complete chronology of my books and DVDs

and here is a place where you can look for books by category – the Book Barn.

Cherry Hill

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Hi Cherry,

In your almanac, you say that the repeated wet/dry cycle can damage the quality of a horse’s hooves.

My horses and I are avid swimmers in the summer…  I usually take them out every day to relieve them from the heat… they love it!  Splashing and swishing and dunking… we have a blast!

They are both young (6 & 7) geldings on 24/7 turnout with free choice grass hay and twice daily grain (1/2 cup hi fat hi fibre).

Am I doing them more harm than their fun is worth?

Christena

Hi Christena,

It depends on where you live, the temperature and humidity, the condition of your horses’ hooves and skin, and your management.

For example, if you live in a hot, humid climate, although the swim might feel good, it might take hours (or maybe never) for the horse’s coat, skin and hooves to thoroughly dry out. That can set the stage for skin problems, fungus and hoof deterioration.

A daily swim here in semi-arid Colorado would be fine – it would be refreshing and the horse would dry quickly.

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Hi Cherry,

When my horses loses a shoe it takes almost a week until my shoer comes out to replace it. What should I do in the meantime? Caitlan

Hi Caitlan,

Ask your shoer what he or she prefers, but here is what hubby Richard Klimesh, long time shoer says…….

An unshod hoof should have rounded and smooth edges that resist chipping and cracking. When a hoof is prepared for shoeing, however, the edges are left sharp but they are protected by the shoe. When a horse loses a shoe, the sharp edge can easily break.There are several ways to protect the bare hoof until your farrier can replace the shoe.

Hoof boots come in various sizes and styles, so look for one that will fit your horse’s hooves. Hind hooves usually take a smaller boot than the front hooves. The boot should fit snugly and not rub the skin of the coronary band or pastern.

If you do not have a hoof boot, you can use several layers of duct tape to protect the edge of the hoof from chipping. If your horse has a tender sole, you can tape a cloth over the bottom of the sole to protect it.

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When my dear hubby Richard built my scriptorium (the cottage where I write) he put in lots and lots of bookshelves…..that was, well, I don’t want to say HOW many years ago but a long time !!

The shelves are now overflowing and its time to downsize my collection.

Most of the books are new or like new. Many have never been opened. Some are current titles and others are vintage and out of print. I’ll be adding a handful every week or so, so keep an eye on Used Horse Books.

Likewise, Richard is also going through his video and DVD collection.

We hope you find something you need or have been looking for.

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Hi Cherry,
I have an quarter horse mare that I just bought she is the sweetest thing in the world, she is at the stables where I keep my other horse the owner sold us the other too and perfectly healthy,my quarter I was testing her and noticed that her thighs and back legs are very swollen I know for an fact that she has not been out for one month so due of being in her stall for so long I am pretty sure that is the problem. Also when I made her trot she was limping but her hoofs are very long and broken that will be fixed this week. I will exercise her every day  and i massage her legs, someone said that it never goes away I am not sure about that. It is cold now and the barn is not heated so I do not want to put cold water on her legs can I do cold compresses and the then wipe her dry?
When she walks she does not limp only when she trots what are your suggestions on that?
I just want to know if this stays for the rest of her life or with exercise and taking her out it will go away she is not in pain
Thank you so much
Monika

Hi Monika,

There was a salty and sweet vet that I worked with once that used to look at a horse like yours and say, “All she needs is fresh air and exercise.”

A horse that has not been out of her stall for a month will “stock up” which is a horseman’s way of saying “swell in the legs”. Some horses stock up if they don’t receive daily exercise. All horses should have either free daily exercise (turnout in a large area where they can run and buck and roll) or daily exercise such as longeing or riding.

But before you even think about exercising the horse, she needs hoof care. All horses should have their hooves attended to (trimmed or shod) every 6-8 weeks. When a horse’s hooves have become so long as to begin cracking and breaking off, it is way past due for the horse to have farrier care.

When a horse limps at the trot, that means the horse IS in pain – it hurts to put its weight on that hoof or limb.

So my suggestions are to get the horse hoof care immediately, keep her on a 6-8 week hoof care program per your farrier’s recommendation and exercise her daily.

Then your sweet horse will be comfortable and will last you a lot longer.

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Cherry,
We have been using the book Maximum Hoof Power as a reference for the Canadian Pony Club for as long as I can remember. The content is clear, concise and fits our needs perfectly! We are updating our reading list this year and since it is out of print, I’d like to know if you can recommend a book to replace it?
Thank you for your help,
Christy

Hi Christy,

Thanks for your inquiry.

A little history.

Maximum Hoof Power was originally published by Macmillan Publishing in 1994 in their animal imprint division called Howell Book House. Shortly after the book was released, Macmillan Publishing was acquired by Simon and Schuster (also 1994). Then the Howell Book House imprint was acquired by John Wiley and Sons in 2001. Along the way, many of the animal titles went out of print. Trafalgar Square released a paperback edition of Maximum Hoof Power in 1999 which was available for several years until it too went OOP (Out of Print).

To get the hoof information back into the hands of horseowners, Richard and I worked with Storey Publishing to incorporate much of the content from Maximum Hoof Power into our new hoof book, Horse Hoof Care. It was released in 2009.

I hope this book works well for you in the Canadian Pony Club.

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For the Horse Who Has Everything

©  2010 Cherry Hill
www.horsekeeping.com

Is there is a special horse on your Christmas list that you would like to thank in some way for his enjoyable partnership and devotion to duty?  If so, show that you really appreciate him by choosing something that a horse would enjoy.  Pass up the reindeer antlers and choose something from this, a horse’s Christmas wish list.

As you might suspect, with horses, food items top the list.  If you have several horses, you can wish them all happy holidays with a truck load of carrots.  Some farms sell a pick up load for $100 or so delivered.  If you have a cool shady place to store them, they will likely keep until the last one is fed.  Carrots provide a welcome diversion to the horse’s normal ration and can be a healthy reward for good behavior.  Carrots are an excellent sources of carotene, the precursor to Vitamin A. Vitamin A is usually the only vitamin that ever needs to be supplemented in a horse’s diet.  If a horse is not receiving green sun-cured hay, he may not be getting adequate carotene.  If a truck load is not an option, then set aside the $$ to buy large bags of carrots or apples, especially affordable if you belong to a buyer’s club like Sam’s.  If you’re on a tight budget, you’d be surprised at how many perfectly good (for horses) carrots and apples are thrown away by grocery stores every day.  Make friends with your local produce manager and arrange to pick up goodies for your horse regularly.

When the temperature dips, oatmeal makes a healthy and warming breakfast for you.  Likewise, at the barn, during cold weather, your horse might relish a hot grain mash.  It takes a little practice and some testing to see what grains and mash consistency appeal to each horse.  Don’t think of wheat bran as the only choice for a mash.  In fact, wheat bran, fed on a daily basis, can be detrimental since it could add too much phosphorus to your horse’s diet.  There should be no such problem if you only feed wheat bran once a week.  But also experiment with mashes made from rolled oats, sweet feed, cracked corn, barley, shredded beet pulp, a handful of molasses or a pinch of salt, some oil or chopped apples or carrots and you are on your way to satisfying your horse’s culinary pleasures (or at least enjoying the benevolent feeling you get from trying!).

Measure and mix the dry ingredients the night before and bring them to the house in a pail. When you put the water on for your tea the next morning, boil some extra water for the mash. Usually a 4:1 ratio of grains to boiling water is satisfactory for most horses.  It is best to err on the dry side rather than the mushy side.  Stir as you pour the water.  Let the mash steep in a warm place for about thirty minutes, preferably covered so it can steam.  Check the temperature and serve.  Take a mug of hot tea out to the barn for yourself, find a warm corner to sit and then listen to the contented slurpings of your appreciative buddies.  And know that beside the nutritional benefits, a mash during cold weather can provide your horse with the needed moisture he might be reluctant to sip from a cold bucket.

Swirl a candy cane in your horse’s water pail?  This is not just a frivolous holiday act but can have a practical application.  Peppermint oil is one substance that can be used to disguise water for the horse that is often “on the road” and will be offered different types of water to drink. Using an aromatic and tasty substance in his water while he is both at home and away, may be the best gift you give a reluctant drinker.

A tasty treat that doubles as a pacifier for the a horse that is stalled during cold weather is a molasses grain block.  Sold across the country under hundreds of local feed mill labels, these blocks should be considered as an occasional supplement to the horse’s normal diet.  Under most feeding circumstances, they are unnecessary, but horses dearly love them.  Comprised of grain products, molasses and minerals, the forty to fifty pound cubes have a wonderful smell and a texture that entices horses to both lick and chew them.  Similar products are made for sheep and cattle, but contain a synthetic source of protein called urea which horses can’t utilize.  For horses, it is important to purchase the “premium” horse version which contains protein from plant sources, such as soybean meal.  Most horses appear to enjoy these large “candy bar blocks” and, in fact, some horses are determined to finish an entire block all at once.  If your horse falls in this category, you will have to roll the block out of his stall or pen each day and only let him have access to it for a limited period of time.  Be sure he always has adequate water available, as even the small percentage of salt in most of these blocks will increase your horse’s thirst reflex – which is a good thing during cold weather.

Probably the next most popular request on a horse’s wish list is his desire to be allowed to be a horse.  Many horses like nothing better than to nose around a pasture inspecting roots and sticks and tracing recent equine history.  From observations, it seems like a roll in the mud or the snow is hard to beat on the equine list of all time favorite recreational activities.  Contrary to our guidelines, horses see nothing wrong in being dirty or having their manes flop over to both sides of their necks.

Depending on the type of winter management that you follow, you may wish To Groom or Not To Groom.  A pasture horse, left to his natural devices, grows a thick protective coat and further seals his skin from wind and moisture by accumulating a heavy waxy sebum at the base of his hairs. Horses that are turned out for the winter should not be extensively groomed, lest you inadvertently remove your horse’s valuable oily protection.  The best gift for the pastured horse is to let his waxy layer stay intact (no vigorous currying), let his coat be fluffy (not smoothed down by brushing) and to offer him shelter from wet weather or piercing winter winds.

If your horse would be more comfortable with a winter blanket, be sure to choose a waterproof, breathable one that can be easily laundered so you’ll perform that task when necessary.  Read the two articles in the Horse Information Roundup that relate to winter blankets to help you choose and use a winter blanket properly.

The stalled horse that is in work not only appreciates but requires vigorous grooming.  A special Christmas session might include body stropping which is an isotonic muscle exercise.  You can use a cactus cloth or a wisp for the stropping.  It’s a vigorous exercise which includes pounding the large muscle masses of the neck, shoulder and hindquarter with moderate pressure which stimulates circulation and then casting off waste products with a sweeping motion.  Massage your horse’s legs with your hands using a circular motion toward the heart.  Massage your horse’s head with an ear rub for the finale – inside and out ending with a slight pulling as you slide your fingers off the tips of your horse’s ears.  Be forewarned – horses given such a body rub are likely to melt in a puddle!

If the cold weather has kept your horse in and he is lonely, he might appreciate a stall companion.  Some friendships just happen and do not have to be arranged.  Cats, chickens, lambs and dogs have been known to voluntarily take up quarters with a compatible horse. The daily treks and routines of both horse and companion provide interest and comfort for each other.  Pigmy goats and other pets or small livestock can sometimes be successfully transplanted in a lonely horse’s stall.

As we know, the holiday season is not complete without family and friends.  And so it is with equines.  A real treat, especially for a stalled horse, is to be turned out with a favorite (compatible!) companion.  There is nothing quite so joyous as two buddies ripping and tearing in the paddock, playing all the bucking and twisting games that are so important in the horse world.  Even though mutual grooming can mess up a lovely mane, it provides unequaled satisfaction and contentment for a horse that is starved for socialization
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If you feel you must give an actual present to your horse, perhaps an innovative stall toy is the answer.  Designed to wile away the hours and discourage wood chewing and other vices, stall toys can channel pent up energies toward  non-destructive play.  Commercial models are often huge rubber balls but a gallon milk container can works too.  Experiment with hanging the toy from various heights.  Note that if your horse becomes obsessed with playing with a toy, you may see some undesirable changes in the curvature of his neck so monitor how he plays and what height is optimum. A variation on this idea is giving a horse a sturdy beach ball to play with in a small paddock or indoor arena.

Horses are appreciative when we make their work easier and more comfortable.  One way to do this is to make sure he is shod for balance, comfort and safety year round.  A consultation with an equine veterinary specialist or a master farrier may turn up some helpful ideas regarding your horse ‘s shoeing.  Besides checking for proper break-over and flat landing, you may be introduced to new ways to provide safe footing for winter riding.

Another way to make a horse’s work easier is to become a more physically fit and athletic rider. Give your horse the gift of becoming a more effective rider.  Promise to stick with the suppling exercises that help you to mount smoothly and ride more fluidly.  Lose a few pounds to ease his burden.  Strengthen your body and become a working member of the team, not just a passenger.  Make a New Year’s Resolution to take some riding lessons to improve yourself so that you are a better member of your horse-human team.

Finally, let your horse luxuriate in some peace and quiet.  Offer him a comfortable place where he can doze or lay without distracting lights and noises.  Let him sigh and whinny in his sleep and wake when he’s ready.  Peace.

 

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Hello, my name is abbie and i would like to say your website was very useful. But could you please give me a cheap and easy product to get hold of in the UK please. My horses had their shoes done today and well he told us that one was not able to have shoes because of brittle hoof but can still be ridden. I will still ride but i want to keep them healthy. Please reply this is an important request, it needs dealing with as soon as possible please. Thanks, Abbie. 🙂

Hello Abbie,

There is an article on Cherry Hill’s Horse Information Roundup page that talks about this problem. Read this article: Dry, Brittle Hooves.

We all like “cheap and easy” but when it comes to our horses’ health and comfort it usually take a considerable investment of time and money. I don’t know what products are  available in the UK – use the Internet to find out. Start by searching for “Keratex hoof hardener” and “horse hoof supplements”.

I’d be careful about riding a horse barefoot if his hooves are too poor to hold shoes. I suggest you get several more opinions on the horse’s feet from other farriers and vets.

Best of Luck,
Richard Klimesh

Horse Hoof Care by Cherry Hill and Richard Klimesh

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Good Afternoon!

I am a newly developed horse lover and I just wanted to say I read your book “Cherry Hill’s Horsekeeping Almanac”. It was very informative and I enjoyed your insight.  In our Public Library that’s all we had on you and your books.  The horse selection is very old and few on the shelves here.  In the next few years I plan on having a career, or owning a few horses myself.  Thank you so much for writing the book and living the life you wanted.  Your an inspiration to me and all horse lovers a like.  Keep up the great work! Marilyn S.

 

Cherry Hill's Horsekeeping Almanac

 

Hi Marilyn,

Thanks so much for taking the time to write.  I’m so glad my Almanac has helped inspire you to continue to reach for your dream.  I’m happy to share what I have been fortunate to experience and learn about horses and their care and training. The Almanac, which was published in 2007, was a perfect medium to be able to paint the whole year round picture here at Long Tail Ranch.

And thanks also for your encouragement to keep up the work ! The art of writing is applying the seat of the pants to the seat of the chair and sometimes that keeps us writers out of the saddle more than we like ! But there are several new books in the works – one which I am just finishing up the final touches on and will be out in a few months.

I’ll post information about the new books when they become available or you can visit Chronology of Books and Videos by Cherry Hill – the newest ones are at the top of the left column.

Keep working toward your dream and best of luck to you,

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