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Horse Radio Network

Cherry Hill will be one of many equestrian guests on the Holiday Radiothon on Horse Radio Network on November 28.

She will appear at 6 PM Eastern Time  – tune in and hear what she has to say !

 

 

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How to Think Like a Horse by Cherry Hill now translated into Polish

How to Think Like a Horse by Cherry Hill now translated into Polish

 

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2015

Translated into Polish:

How to Think Like a Horse
The Essential Handbook for Understanding
Why Horses Do What They Do

by Cherry Hill

Myslec Jak Kon

Cherry Hill
Jak Zrozumiec Zachowania Konia

 

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The ebook is on sale for $2.99 during the month of April – click here to learn more.

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Think in Italian 001

 

Translated into Italian:

How to Think Like a Horse
The Essential Handbook for Understanding
Why Horses Do What They Do

by Cherry Hill

Pensare Come un Cavallo
Manuale per Capire il Comportamento dei Cavalli

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Good afternoon,
Like you, I am a big fan and lover of horses.
I am currently reading Cherry Hill’s book: How to think like a horse and this is the result of a picture my mom took of ” us” 🙂
Its such a wonderful book! And I am sure I will get a couple more of Mrs. Hill’s books.
If possible, please share this picture with the : How to think like a horse Team.
I hope they like it and find it very amusing as I did.
Thank you very much and continue your wonderful work!
Maria
Think reader
Hi Maria !
We all loved your photo and especially Cherry Hill !! Thanks for sending it !!
Paula, manager of www.horsekeeping.com

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Cherry Hill: The Horsewoman Behind All Those Great Horse Books

Author Cherry Hill and her mare, Aria. | Photo courtesy of Cherry Hill

Author Cherry Hill and her mare, Aria. | Photo courtesy of Cherry Hill

How does Cherry Hill do it?

If you are a reader of horse books at all, you know the name–she’s been a horse show judge, trainer, breeder and is the author of more than 1,000 articles and 30 books, including What Every Horse Should Know, Horsekeeping on a Small Acreage and 101 Ground Training Exercises for Every Horse & Handler.

Cherry Hill (and Cherry is pronounced “Sherry”) took the time to talk to MyHorse Daily about writing, life on her ranch and the one surprising thing she’s done on horseback.

MyHorse Daily: Where were you born and raised, and how did you get into horses?

Cherry Hill: I was raised in Michigan, and I’ve been into horses all my life. We used to go to Florida every year, and when I was 2 my father made arrangements for my brother and I to get on the back of one of the (Ringling Bros.) Barnum & Bailey horses. I didn’t want to wash my hands for a week.

I didn’t get my own horse until I was in my early 20s–there was not really a place to have one where I grew up–but I rode all through high school. I got a job at a stable and worked for unlimited riding by helping out—I took people out on rides, called being a “pusher” because sometimes the horses didn’t want to go out.

The woman who got me the job was a long-term horsewoman, a bit of a mentor to me. And a lot of times people ask me how to get into horses, and I say, “Find a mentor in your area” Maybe they’re not riding anymore but they have a wealth of experience that is invaluable.

 MyHorse Daily: What did you study in college?

Cherry Hill: I got a degree in Animal Science. When I was going to school, Equine Science wasn’t really off the ground yet. I majored in horses, minored in dairy, at Michigan State and Iowa State.

MyHorse Daily: What have you taught?

Cherry Hill: I’ve taught at a few colleges, most recently Colorado State University. I taught Equine Science—training, stable management, behavior.

MyHorse Daily: Where do you live?

Cherry Hill: In northern Colorado. I live on a ranch with my husband–we have 70 acres. It’s a lovely place. It’s a full-time job. We’re always going. Busy, busy, busy.

MyHorse Daily: Where do you find time to write?

Cherry Hill: Some I’ve written on horseback by speaking into a recorder, so I wrote while I was riding.

Some I’ve written in the heat of summer or dead of winter. It does take time and discipline. People think writing is effortless but it does require discipline.

MyHorse Daily: How do you get ideas?

horsekeeping bookCherry Hill: Mostly it’s what I’m really into at the time. I think if I’m really interested in it, other horse people will be also. For example, my husband and I used to buy, fix up and sell horse property–that gave me the idea for Horsekeeping on a Small Acreage.

Each time I’d do something at home I’d think well, maybe I’ll write about it and save some people some time. Of course training and behavior are always topics people are interested in. I guess write what you love and write what you know and the rest follows. Also, if you’re doing something at the moment, you have the photo opportunity. It will all dovetail together and work.

MyHorse Daily: What kind of horse do you have?

Cherry Hill: Aria is half Quarter Horse and half Trakehner mare that I bred and raised. She’s a real sweet, steady, easygoing kind of girl with comfortable gaits. She’s 15.2, maybe 16. One of the littler ones we have. I call her my chocolate pony, because her disposition is sweet, like a pony. She’s a good girl. More of a western-style horse.

I ride more western now. We are in trail-ride heaven here–we have beautiful places to ride. Western riding is a little more suited to that because of the saddlebags and more comfortable saddle. Although in the arena I prefer to ride dressage.

MyHorse Daily: How many horses do you have now?

Cherry Hill: We just have two horses. Due to the drought and expense of feed we haven’t added to our herd or bred any mares. There’s so many horses to adopt or buy inexpensively. We went from 7 down to 2 just by the fact so many were in their 30s. We will keep those two until we need to replace one. They have a many good years left–Aria is 14 and Sherlock, (her husband) Richard’s horse, is 11.

MyHorse Daily: What about the rest of the pack?

Cherry Hill: We have a Maine Coon cat. She’s a good mouser and great companion. We also have two rottweilers about a year and a half old. Got them at 6 weeks. They’re named Bear and Bandit. Fabulous dogs. They’ve learned about horses and all the other animals and boundaries. They’re really good dogs and our constant companions. I keep saddle blankets on the floor next to my desk for them.

MyHorse Daily: What are you working on now?

Cherry Hill: I’m not working on a book right now–I just had one come out last year and wanted to take a break.

MyHorse Daily:  Which of your books are your favorites?

How to Think Like a HorseCherry Hill:  Horsekeeping on a Small Acreage helped a lot of people. Also, How to Think Like a Horse helps people understand why their horse does what it does.

MyHorse Daily: What’s some of your best advice?

Cherry Hill: Don’t forget the reason you got into it is because you really love the horse. People get sidetracked on competition or property.

Enjoy that experience of interacting with and taking good care of your horse. That’s one of the reasons I quit judging—some of the competition people had forgotten about that, and were interested more in the superficial aspect and achieving goals, sometimes at the expense of the horse.

Another piece: Just do the best job you can taking care of your horse and understanding why they do what they do. Figure out how to keep your horse happy, healthy and safe.

MyHorse Daily: Any advice for folks who are trying to keep horses in their life as they age?

Cherry Hill: I think mostly it’s being aware—everybody’s different—but be aware of what causes you to slow down. You have to be your own doctor, so to speak. Take the responsibility to take care of your own body. So once you find out your weak links-for example, your knees hurt after a long ride—adjust your stirrups or don’t ride so much of a posting trot. Adjust yourself accordingly.

You do just get more stiff as you get old. Horses get arthritis, too. If you’re a real active rider like I’ve been, your body parts are gonna wear out.

MyHorse Daily: Is it worth it?

Cherry Hill: I wouldn’t have it any other way. That’s the whole richness of life—doing what you love.

Categories: Horse Care.

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By Amy Herdy

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Hi Cherry,

I am a very inexperienced horse person, but I want to get more involved with horses.  I had my first official training session the other day and everything went really well.  I just have a question about how the horse, a 22 yr old mare, behaved at the end of the ride.  I was leading her back to her regular stall, but had to stop walking for just a second to talk to someone.  She stopped and stood there relaxed for a few seconds, but then out of nowhere she nudged me on the side/arm.  It wasn’t rough enough to put me off balance, but it was sudden enough for me to get a little nervous.  I am wondering what this meant and when/how to react to it.  I keep reading different opinions – some saying it’s affection others saying it’s disrespect.  I doubt it was affection as this horse doesn’t know me.  All I did was tell her “hey, no girl” in a firm voice and she didn’t do it again.
She was so close to me that I couldn’t really see what the rest of her body was doing, legs, rear etc…  Any advice or interpretation?  I want to make sure I did the right thing, and if not what to do next time. Thank you!

Merri

Hi Merri,

The mare was probably testing the waters, checking to see if she could nudge into your space or push you a little bit, so in a way, it is
a form of disrespect…….like if someone interrupted you while you were talking and wanted you to get going…….you reacted perfectly.

If she, or another horse does this again, stand your ground – in other words, don’t move yourself, keep your feet planted and flick your elbow at the horse to tell it to stay in its own space, and you can use a short voice command like “No” or “Go on”. The important thing is to not move yourself or the horse “won”.

If you watch horses interact with each other, they tell other horses to stay out of their space in various ways. They might do it with a nudge or a bite, kick, lunge, strike, body slam….so this mare was using a mild form of pushiness, but pushiness nonetheless.

More articles:

Teach Your Horse Respect for Your Personal Space

Personal Space – Don’t Crowd Me

To read more about horse behavior, refer to How to Think Like a Horse.

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Where is Slovenia?

It is a land of horse lovers that is located between Italy, Austria, Hungary and Croatia.

Slovenia

How to Think Like a Horse by Cherry Hill is now available in Slovenian.

How to Think Like a Horse by Cherry Hill, Slovenian Translation

To see more foreign translations visit the Cherry Hill book chronology.

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We know the shortest distance between two points is a straight line. Some horses at some times also know this. But it is interesting to observe the other routes horses take which must be perfectly normal to them.

Right now we have our 3 horses out on 3 separate pastures. In the morning when I jingle my mares, I first go to Aria’s pasture and when I rattle the metal gate her head comes up, she does a turn on the hindquarters until she faces me and then walks a straight line to me, sometimes not so fast as I’d like, but basically a straight line. Her walk to the gate is downhill.

Then I go to Seeker’s pasture gate – of course by then, she knows “its time” so she has started walking up to the gate. Her trek to the gate is all uphill. The path she chooses is quite interesting in that she probably covers twice as much ground as she would if she came straight to the gate. It is obvious that her choices are based on ease of travel. Instead of coming directly uphill toward the gate, she weaves back and forth…….like a sensible mountain trail horse I guess.

Then there is the energizer bunny Sherlock. When Richard goes out to call him in, as soon as he whistles, Sherlock kicks into his floating, ground covering canter, but because he loves to move, he takes the scenic route. There is no doubt that he is definitely on his way to Richard but he might canter the entire perimeter of the 20 acre pasture on his way there. Very fun to watch. And even with all that traveling, he probably takes less time to get there than the girls do when I call them !

Horses. What a treat to observe.

 

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Hi Cherry,

I’ve noticed lately that my TWH mare seems to be rubbing her beautiful long wavy mane off.  I noticed several weeks ago that part of her mane near her withers suddenly became very short.  I figured maybe she got it caught in something and I did not really worry about it too much.  But now I’m noticing that the short part keeps getting bigger and bigger.  I suspect that she is rubbing it on something but I’m not sure what.  She is pasture kept most of the time with her buddies.  If she is not in the pasture then she is in the dry lot with her buddies with hay in hay nets.  I can’t seem to find any evidence on the fence or anything.  Her mane does not look irritated or anything, just short.  I never catch her in the act.  I’m worried that if this continues, her beautiful mane will be all straggles.  To make matters worse, I was planning to sell her in the next few weeks.  I know it can take years for a mane to grow back completely.  Is there anything I can do? 

Thanks,  Ingrid

 

Hi Ingrid,

It sounds more like your mare and one of her pasture buddies are participating in vigorous bouts of “mutual grooming” that normal social activity where two horses stand next to each other facing opposite directions and scratch each others neck, withers and back with their teeth. This results in lost mane hair right where you describe.

That’s one of the drawbacks of group turnout but the horses sure seem to enjoy it !!

As far as what you can do about it, you can separate the mare from her buddies, you can get her a textilene fly sheet with a neck extension, or you can spray a safe anti-chew product on her mane area. There are several products specifically designed for this.

 

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