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Archive for the ‘Used and Collectible’ Category

More books from my personal library are being added to the Buy One, Get TWO FREE page – some vintage, some New Old Stock, some just plain old NEW !

Visit the BOG2F page now.

Take a look – here are just a few of the latest additions.

 

a-horse-of-your-own complete-horse-riding-manual dark-horses-and-black-beauties essentials-of-horsekeeping george-stubbs-198w horses-for-dummies horses-hitches-rocky-trails riders-problem-solver the-horse-in-art the-horse

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Horse Radio Network

Cherry Hill will be one of many equestrian guests on the Holiday Radiothon on Horse Radio Network on November 28.

She will appear at 6 PM Eastern Time  – tune in and hear what she has to say !

 

 

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Horse Books - Buy One Get Two Free

Horse Books – Buy One Get Two Free

First Aid Kit

The purpose of a first aid kit is to provide you with the tools and supplies you need to give immediate care to your horse.

I have 3 barn first aid kits. One next to the crossties that holds frequently used items.

The other two are in the tack room.

I keep a commercial human first aid kit right by the door.

And I keep my custom trauma kit ready when I need it and at room temperature. I assembled all of the essential tools and supplies for dealing with a wound in a large plastic container with a snap lid. (Available in the home storage section of your favorite department store).

When an emergency strikes, I know when I open my kit, all the necessary items will be there, ready to use.

FIRST AID KIT CONTENTS

first aid book
veterinarian’s phone number
flashlight and batteries
latex gloves
thermometer
lubricating jelly
Betadine solution
Betadine ointment (povidone-iodine, 10%)
triple antibiotic ointment furacin ointment (nitrofurazone)
saline eyewash
phenylbutazone (Butazolidine)
Banamine (flunixin meglumine)
wooden applicator sticks
non-stick gauze pads
conforming gauze padding (leg quilts or disposable diapers)
self-adhering stretch bandage
elastic adhesive tape
scissors
pocket knife
tweezers
stethoscope
watch with second hand
disposable syringes and needles
instant cold compress

TO HAVE ON HAND

chain twitch
protective hoof boot
weight tape
clean buckets
clean cloths
clean spray bottle
portable lights (clamp or stand)
extension cords

 

IN REFRIGERATOR

antibiotics
epinephrine

Horse Books - Buy One get TWO FREE

Horse Books – Buy One get TWO FREE

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From Cherry Hill’s Horsekeeping Almanac

Almanac-250w

Shedding horses, green grass, the return of the meadowlarks . . . spring is here! When I go to bed each night, I am often rehearsing all the things I want to do the next day as I slip into dreamland, and when my feet hit the floor every morning, they are in high gear. This is the beginning of a new horse season and it can’t start too early for me.

Mother Nature, however, can bring some interesting events to the mix. We usually have our deepest and wettest snowstorms during March, April, and even May. So although I am revved, I always need a backup plan in place if the weather makes it unsafe or impossible to train or ride.

The horses are all brought in from winter pastures in March, if not before, to allow the land to rest and the plants to grow. Each horse has his own separate sheltered pen. I bring the horses back into work one at a time, starting with a grooming program. I might vigorously groom a horse daily to remove as much of the shedding hair as possible, or in some cases, I might bathe a horse in early March and give him a body clip. (See more about body clips in December.) Until a horse is 95 percent shed out, I usually don’t put a sheet on him. Then I either give him a turnout sheet or a fly sheet, depending on the weather, to protect his coat.

The horses are still on a 100 percent hay ration, but I cut back a bit to help them start to lose their winter fat and hay belly if they have one. Because they are in pens, they require exercise, so I review in-hand and longeing to get them back into work mode.

I pay attention to each horse’s specific needs for conditioning and adjust rations as needed.

Horses in training are kept shod, and even some that are not in training are kept shod to protect their hooves from our abrasive Rocky Mountain terrain. It is great having a resident farrier!

This time of year, the horses are fed three times per day, at 6:00 a.m., noon, and 7:00 p.m. The seniors are still getting their beet pulp and supplements, and the rest of the horses receive beet pulp with additives as their level of work dictates.

Spring makes us all feel great. I’m spending lots of time outdoors. I always wear a broad-brimmed hat, bandanna around my neck, gloves, and long-sleeved shirt. This is mainly to protect my eyes and skin from sun damage. I often find that from this time of year through fall, I get plenty of varied exercise from chores, grooming, training, riding, mowing, and facilities maintenance tasks, so the indoor exercise equipment gets a little dusty over the summer. The early mornings and late afternoons can still be a bit chilly, so mainly for my horse’s sake, I try to do vigorous training and riding either mid-morning or mid-afternoon, giving them plenty of time to cool out thoroughly before chilly evening temperatures.

 

Visit our Good Horse Books site for new, used and collectible horse books – Buy one and get TWO FREE.

horse-books-used-group-200w

Here are a few added today

longeing-ground-training-harris-250h

Haymaker's Handbook

Haymaker’s Handbook

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