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More books from my personal library are being added to the Buy One, Get TWO FREE page – some vintage, some New Old Stock, some just plain old NEW !

Visit the BOG2F page now.

Take a look – here are just a few of the latest additions.

 

a-horse-of-your-own complete-horse-riding-manual dark-horses-and-black-beauties essentials-of-horsekeeping george-stubbs-198w horses-for-dummies horses-hitches-rocky-trails riders-problem-solver the-horse-in-art the-horse

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Horse Books - Buy One Get Two Free

Horse Books – Buy One Get Two Free

First Aid Kit

The purpose of a first aid kit is to provide you with the tools and supplies you need to give immediate care to your horse.

I have 3 barn first aid kits. One next to the crossties that holds frequently used items.

The other two are in the tack room.

I keep a commercial human first aid kit right by the door.

And I keep my custom trauma kit ready when I need it and at room temperature. I assembled all of the essential tools and supplies for dealing with a wound in a large plastic container with a snap lid. (Available in the home storage section of your favorite department store).

When an emergency strikes, I know when I open my kit, all the necessary items will be there, ready to use.

FIRST AID KIT CONTENTS

first aid book
veterinarian’s phone number
flashlight and batteries
latex gloves
thermometer
lubricating jelly
Betadine solution
Betadine ointment (povidone-iodine, 10%)
triple antibiotic ointment furacin ointment (nitrofurazone)
saline eyewash
phenylbutazone (Butazolidine)
Banamine (flunixin meglumine)
wooden applicator sticks
non-stick gauze pads
conforming gauze padding (leg quilts or disposable diapers)
self-adhering stretch bandage
elastic adhesive tape
scissors
pocket knife
tweezers
stethoscope
watch with second hand
disposable syringes and needles
instant cold compress

TO HAVE ON HAND

chain twitch
protective hoof boot
weight tape
clean buckets
clean cloths
clean spray bottle
portable lights (clamp or stand)
extension cords

 

IN REFRIGERATOR

antibiotics
epinephrine

Horse Books - Buy One get TWO FREE

Horse Books – Buy One get TWO FREE

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Browse new and used horse tack and equipment at horsekeeping.com

Wool plaid cooler

Coolers

A cooler is a lightweight, absorbent cover designed to help a wet horse dry slowly without getting chilled. Essential during cold or cool, breezy weather, these items are also valuable in hot times. Even when he doesn’t need protection from chilling, a cooler can help dry a horse more quickly by wicking moisture away from his hair and letting it evaporate from the outer surface of the cooler. Sometimes, during cold weather, frost will form on the outside of the cooler, a sure sign that it’s working! In the winter, you can layer two coolers after bathing a horse and remove the inner cooler once it has absorbed most of the moisture.

Click photo to purchase

Click photo to purchase

The typical cooler style covers the horse from poll to tail and hangs very long on the sides. It usually has a browband, two or more light tie straps under the neck, and a tail loop, but no surcingle or leg straps. This style is good for throwing over a horse, tack and all, after a workout to allow him to cool down while walking or untacking. Small size is 66 by 72 inches, Regular size is 84 by 90 inches, and Large is 90 by 96 inches.

saratoga-polartec-plaid-1

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Coolers also come in a more fitted stable-sheet style, with one or more belly attachments, front closures, and possibly leg straps. Because this style is more secure on the horse, it’s better suited for a horse that’s unattended, such as a horse turned into a stall or paddock to munch hay after a bath or workout.

Click photo to purchase

Click photo to purchase

Coolers used on sweaty horses need to be easily washable, since the dirt and minerals from sweat remain in the material after the moisture evaporates. Since wool coolers, even when washed cold, are more prone to shrinking than synthetic coolers, you can minimize their trips to the washing machine by double-layering them with a more washable synthetic cooler next to the horse.

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Pacing
Dear Cherry,

We just purchased a two-year-old filly and brought her home. She is in a 24-foot by 12-foot outside stall. She paces back and forth. We tried putting her in a 50-foot round pen and she paced there. Do you have any suggestions? We love the filly and are getting her broke. Help!

Heidi

Hi Heidi,

Here are a series of questions that might help you pinpoint the cause and head toward a cure. Possible causes: Have you checked her ration to be sure you are not feeding her too much high energy feed, such as grain, concentrates, or alfalfa hay? Is she getting plenty of exercise with her training? Does she have time to socialize with other horses?
Possible cures: Can you turn this filly out with another horse, at least occasionally? Do you have any pastures or large paddocks that the horse can be turned out in for at least an hour or so a day? Is she the type of horse that won’t get too fat if she eats a little bit all day? If so, can you feed her some grass hay about four or five times a day?

Cherry Hill

Take advantage of our Book Sale. Buy One and Get TWO FREE on this page. New books are being added weekly in both categories.

We’ve just added some great behavior books about vices and bad habits. horse-owners-problem-solver-200hproblem-horse-200h

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Which Itch Is Which?

Biting gnats, lice, ticks, fungus, and allergies can all cause itching. If your horse rubs bald spots in his mane or tail, check him thoroughly for external parasites such as lice or ticks, parasites (such as pinworms), or fungus, and treat according to your veterinarian’s instructions.

Itching can also be caused by ringworm, which is contagious to you and other horses. If a horse has ringworm, you will need not only to treat the horse but also to disinfect grooming tools, halters, blankets, stalls, feeders, and anything else he may have rubbed on.

Some horses (and dogs) seem to be hypersensitive or allergic to insect bites and once they are bitten, they go into a rubbing frenzy, which then invites other complications. In some cases, this is referred to as sweet itch or Queensland itch. A veterinarian should be consulted, but prevention of bites to susceptible animals is paramount. Remedies include soothing witch hazel or vinegar rinses, and possibly a corticosteroid prescription from your veterinarian.

 

Take advantage of our Book Sale. Buy One and Get TWO FREE on this page. New books are being added weekly in both categories.

We’ve just added some great equine veterinary texts and references books.

equine-medicine-surgery-3-bothhorseowners-veterinary-handbook

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Visual Exam

Overall stance and attitude.

As I approach the barn, does the horse have his head up, are his eyes bright, and is he eager for feed or is he lethargic, inattentive, or anxious?

Legs.

I look at the horse from both sides so I will quickly spot any wounds, swelling or puffiness.

Appetite.

Has the horse finished all of his feed from the previous feeding?

Water.

Is there evidence that he has he taken in a sufficient amount of water?

Manure.

Is the fecal material well formed or is it hard and dry, loose and sloppy, covered with mucus or parasites, or filled with whole grains? Are there at least three to four manure piles since I last fed? (six to eight bowel movements per 24-hour day is normal.)

Pen, shelter, or stall.

Are there signs of pawing, rubbing, rolling, thrashing, or wood-chewing?

Excerpt from Almanac-250w

I’m thinning out my personal horse book collection. Visit our website and you can Buy One and GET TWO FREE !!  Cherry Hill

fitting-tack-250htaming-wild-horses-250hgrooming-250h

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From Cherry Hill’s Horsekeeping Almanac

Almanac-250w

THE HORSES’ DAY

5:00 a.m. Stand near feed spots

6:00 a.m. Eat

8:00 a.m. Walk over to the water tub for a drink

8:15 a.m. Return to the feed area to vacuum up the dregs

10:00 a.m. Exercise and training (this varies for each horse; some will be exercised in the afternoon), doze, or lay down

Noon Eat

2:00 p.m. Drink

2:15 p.m. Doze, lie down, or exercise and train

5:30 p.m. Stand near feed spots

6:00 p.m. Eat

8:00 p.m. Drink

8:15 p.m. Mosey or doze until dawn, keeping alert for unusual sights or sounds

Dexter’s Day

From Magner’s Standard Horse and Stock Book by D. Magner, 1916
“The following is the routine pursued with Dexter:

“At six every morning, Dexter has all the water he wants, and two quarts of oats. After eating, he is ‘walked’ for half an hour or more, then cleaned off, and at nine has two quarts more of oats. If no drive is on the card for afternoon, he is given a half to three quarters of an hour of gentle exercise. At one o’clock he has his oats again, as before, limited to two quarts.

“From three to four he is driven from twelve to fifteen miles; after which he is cleaned off and rubbed thoroughly dry. He has a bare swallow of water, on returning from the drive, but is allowed free access to his only feed of hay, of which he consumes from five to six pounds.

“If the drive has been a particularly sharp one, he is treated, as soon as he gets in, to a quart of oatmeal gruel; and when thoroughly cool, has half a pail of water and three quarts of oats, with two quarts of bran moistened with hot water. Before any specially hard day’s work or trial of his speed, his allowance of water is still more reduced.”

 

MY DAY

5:30 a.m. – Rise

6:00 a.m. Chores and visual exam

7:00 a.m. Breakfast

8:00 a.m. Work in office

9:00 a.m. Head to the barn for grooming, tacking up, training, and riding Noon Chores, then lunch

1:00 p.m. Work in office or barn, domestic duties, or sometimes take a nap in my recliner

2:00 p.m. Back to the barn

6:00 p.m. Chores and visual exam

7:00 p.m. Supper

8:00 p.m. Nightly movie or read a good horse book

10:30 p.m. Go to bed

colours-markings-250hart-of-longeing-200hmouths-bits-250h

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